Study the Effect of Herbicide Imazethapyr Application in Established Alfalfa Farms on Non-Target Creatures (Case Study: Ladybug Population)

Raoofi, Mohammad and Alebrahim, Mohammad Taghi and Giti, Somayeh and Baghestani, Mohammad Ali and Khanjani, Mohammad (2017) Study the Effect of Herbicide Imazethapyr Application in Established Alfalfa Farms on Non-Target Creatures (Case Study: Ladybug Population). In: 1st International and 5th National Conference on Organic vs. Conventional Agriculture, 16-17 August 2017, Ardabil, Iran.

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Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of different doses of the herbicide Imazethapyr on the population of soil fauna non-target organisms. This experiment was carried out on weed-infested established alfalfa farms. The experiment was conducted during spring and summer from 2014–2015 in a randomized complete block design with eight treatments, of which non-weed-infested established alfalfa field was a control and, four replications. The results showed that increased application of Imazethapyr has affected lady beetle population, especially until one week after spraying severe losses were observed with high doses of Imazethapyr; therefore, it is important not to exceed the recommended, standard dose. This shows the significance of the use of herbicides and suggests that the arthropods, as an indicator of EIQ, will suffer losses at higher doses. As soon as herbicide is applied to its target, a number of processes immediately begin to remove the compound from the original site of application. This removal is the process of environmental fate. For the herbicide which is intercepted by plants, the chemical may be taken up by the plant itself, may be washed off of the foliage by precipitation or irrigation onto the soil, may undergo photodegradation on plant surfaces, or may volatilize back into the air. Besides that, all living organisms in the soil will be affected by the herbicide. Most herbicides are organic compounds and are therefore basically unstable in the environment. Inherent instability is essential to prevent these materials from accumulating in the environment as compounds are repeatedly used. Unfortunately, not all herbicides exhibit optimal stability properties, and therefore numerous examples of insufficient control (too little stability) or carryover (too much stability) have been reported. Furthermore, persistence in the environment prolongs exposure of the materials to forces that can cause movement of the herbicide away from the application site.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Persian Title: _
Persian Abstract: _
Subjects: Divisions > Conferences > 1st International and 5th National Conference on Organic vs. Conventional Agriculture, 16-17 August 2017
Conferences > 1st International and 5th National Conference on Organic vs. Conventional Agriculture, 16-17 August 2017
Divisions: Conferences > 1st International and 5th National Conference on Organic vs. Conventional Agriculture, 16-17 August 2017
Subjects > Conferences > 1st International and 5th National Conference on Organic vs. Conventional Agriculture, 16-17 August 2017
Date Deposited: 01 Dec 2018 17:40
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2018 17:40
URI: http://repository.uma.ac.ir/id/eprint/3949

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